All posts by ass

Nottingham Squatting Project

Nottingham Indymedia launches with feature on a community squatting project, a feature on squatting and also a straw bale eco-building project on allottments near the city centre ( St Annes ). They must certainly be busy up there.

“A building empty for many years has been occupied. The neighbours constantly fed up with the council inaction, a mess in the garden, drug abusers round the back of the property, windows smashed. Not something you would like to live next door to. Thus, the group has much community support, and now they’re secure in their new home, there is much tidying up to do and this has already begun.”

Link to the articles by Tash on Nottingham Indymedia

Community Squatting Project

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/regions/nottinghamshire/2005/08/321108.html

Feature on squatting

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/regions/nottinghamshire/2005/08/320446.html

Feature On Eco Housing – Straw Bale project

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/regions/nottinghamshire/2005/08/321023.html

Chavez’ land redistribtion

Venezuela’s Chavez presents land titles to indigenous groups
By Thais Leon
ASSOCIATED PRESS
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/world/20050809-1857-venezuela-indigenouslands.html

6:57 p.m. August 9, 2005

KARI’NA LA ISLA, Venezuela ? Six of Venezuela’s indigenous communities received title to their ancestral lands on Tuesday in a ceremony that Venezuela’s president said reversed centuries of injustice.

President Hugo Chavez said he hoped the government would be able to turn over titles to 15 other indigenous communities by the end of the year.

“What we’re recognizing is the original ownership of these lands,” Chavez said during the ceremony. “Now no one will be able to come and trample over you in the future.”

He was joined by Kari’na Indians wearing traditional dress, face paint and strings of colored beads.

But Chavez warned that the process of granting legal ownership must respect Venezuela’s “territorial unity,” and he urged other indigenous groups not to ask for “infinite expanses of territory.”

“Don’t ask me to give you the state’s rights to exploit mines, to exploit oil,” Chavez said. “Before all else comes national unity.”

The documents recognize land ownership by six indigenous communities with some 4,000 people and territory covering 314,000 acres in the eastern states of Anzoategui and Monagas.

One woman from the Kari’na community thanked Chavez, saying: “He has been the first president who has kept his word to a people who have been stripped of their lands.”

An estimated 300,000 Venezuelans belong to 28 indigenous groups, many living in the country’s sparsely populated southeast.

South American countries have made various efforts to grant indigenous groups legal ownership and control over their traditional territories.

In neighboring Colombia, indigenous groups in officially recognized communities can administer justice, receive state funds and have their own government.

Brazil has set aside more than 12 percent of its territory for indigenous communities, and in Peru various laws declare the rights of indigenous groups to ancestral territory in the Amazon.

But problems have arisen in some countries as miners and loggers have moved onto Indian lands. And in various countries, a key debate has revolved around the state’s rights to what lies underground, such as oil and mineral wealth.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/world/20050809-1857-venezuela-indigenouslands.html

Rave Bill Limits Numbers

As part of the Anti-Social Behaviour bill, the House of Lords in October 2003 passed an ammendment to the Criminal Justice Bill which does the following:

  • reduces the legal definition of a “rave” to be 20, not 100 people
  • makes indoor raves illegal
  • stops organisers moving on to second sites.

Adding to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 with this bill they cite in particular Huntingdon ‘Life’ Sciences activism and rave culture aiming “to ensure that it is no longer commercially viable to organise an unlicensed rave. It should be noted that, for the organisers, raves have been highly profitable events. When speaking to young people who have attended them, many believe that they were badly ripped off. They may have had a good time at a rave, but they certainly paid for it.” ( Baroness Scotland of Asshole 7th Oct 2003 , Hansard) !!

The details are as following:

Lord Bassam of Brighton moved Amendment No. 200ZA:

After Clause 59, insert the following new clause?
“RAVES
(1) Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 (c. 33) (powers in relation to raves) is amended as follows.
(2) In subsection (1) for “100” substitute “20”.
(3) After subsection (1) insert?
“(1A) This section also applies to a gathering if?
(a) it is a gathering on land of 20 or more persons who are trespassing on the land; and
(a) it would be a gathering of a kind mentioned in subsection (1) above if it took place on land in the open air.”
(4) In subsection (2) omit “in the open air”.
(5) In subsection (7) for “this section” substitute “subsection (6) above”.
(6) After subsection (7) insert?
“(7A) A person commits an offence if?

7 Oct 2003 : Column 264

(a) he knows that a direction under subsection (2) above has been given which applies to him, and
(b) he makes preparations for or attends a gathering to which this section applies within the period of 24 hours starting when the direction was given.
(7B) A person guilty of an offence under subsection (7A) above is liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months or a fine not exceeding level 4 on the standard scale, or both.””

The noble Lord said: I thank the noble Lord, Lord Dixon-Smith, for raising the issue of raves. He, like me, during our many years in local government, probably experienced the unpleasant side effects of raves?in our postbags and on our telephones at weekends?from members of the public, who were understandably and properly complaining about them and the anti-social behaviour which can arise.

We all know that raves can disrupt the peace and tranquillity of many local communities, in particular during the spring and summer months. I could regale noble Lords with certain unpleasant experiences during my time as leader of my local authority. Because of the hour I shall not do so. However, it should be understood that the Government understand the impact of raves on local communities and we are keen to deal with the problem. We are also grateful that that keenness to act is shared across the Committee.

I recognise that the effect of raves is not limited to the duration of the event itself. These gatherings can bring noise nuisance and traffic congestion on small, wholly unsuited roads. Rubbish may be deposited in often very attractive surroundings.

The legislation relating to raves goes back to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. It was introduced as a response to what the government of the day saw as the growing phenomenon of the rave and the difficulties that this type of unstructured event were likely to cause. Since the introduction of that legislation, we know that the tactics of rave organisers have changed and we recognise the need for the legislation to be updated. In my experience, rave organisers are clever and use the best of modern technology, in particular the mobile phone, to make their arrangements. It is therefore necessary to disrupt those tactics and, in essence, that is what this proposed legislation seeks to do.

The issues relating to raves were raised during the Commons stage of the Bill. Further, it is a matter often raised by members of the public in correspondence. We are pleased to have this opportunity to table amendments in this Bill to Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994.

Raves have been organised in buildings such as barns and disused warehouses. In the past the police have been powerless to act as the current legislation applies only to land in the open air. We therefore propose to extend the legislative powers to include indoor trespassory raves.

Rave organisers have been restricting the number at events to below 100 people in order to frustrate the operation of current legislation, so we propose to amend it to include indoor and outdoor events where

7 Oct 2003 : Column 265

20 or more people are present. This aims to ensure that it is no longer commercially viable to organise an unlicensed rave. It should be noted that, for the organisers, raves have been highly profitable events. When speaking to young people who have attended them, many believe that they were badly ripped off. They may have had a good time at a rave, but they certainly paid for it.

Finally, the police have reported many occasions where rave organisers who have been given a direction to leave have simply moved to another area?a fallback position?to set up another rave. Again, I came across that problem during my time in local government. We propose to make it an offence for a person on whom a direction has been served to attend another trespassory rave within 24 hours of the direction being given.

The proposals will not be perfect and catch every event, but we think that most of the events that in the past have led to problems should be curtailed. The Government believe that these amendments will strengthen the current powers so that the police can provide relief to communities. They will be warmly welcomed by the Association of Chief Police Officers and, no doubt, by officers working on the ground.

I hope that the noble Lord opposite will welcome these government amendments and that, in the circumstances, he will not feel the need to press his own amendments. I beg to move.

Part 8
Public order and trespass
62 Public assemblies
In section 16 of the Public Order Act 1986 (c. 64) (which defines ?public
assembly? for the purposes of the power in section 14 of that Act to impose 5
conditions on public assemblies), in the definition of ?public assembly? for ?20?
substitute ?2?.
63 Bookmark: j6666Raves
(1) Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 (c. 33) (powers in
relation to raves) is amended as follows. 10
(2) In subsection (1) for ?100? substitute ?20?.
(3) After subsection (1) insert?
?(1A) This section also applies to a gathering if?
(a) it is a gathering on land of 20 or more persons who are
trespassing on the land; and 15
(b) it would be a gathering of a kind mentioned in subsection (1)
above if it took place on land in the open air.?
(4) In subsection (2) omit ?in the open air?.
(5) In subsection (7) for ?this section? substitute ?subsection (6) above?.
(6) After subsection (7) insert? 20
?(7A) A person commits an offence if?
(a) he knows that a direction under subsection (2) above has been
given which applies to him, and
(b) he makes preparations for or attends a gathering to which this
section applies within the period of 24 hours starting when the 25
direction was given.
(7B) A person guilty of an offence under subsection (7A) above is liable on
summary conviction to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three
months or a fine not exceeding level 4 on the standard scale, or both.?
64 Bookmark: JNC21Aggravated trespass 30
(1) The Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 (c. 33) is amended as follows.
(2) In section 68 (offence of aggravated trespass), in subsection (1) (which defines
the offence by reference to trespass on land in the open air and lawful activity
on land in the open air) omit ?in the open air? in both places where those words
appear. 35
(3) In section 69 (powers to remove persons committing or participating in
aggravated trespass), in subsection (1) (which confers the power by reference
to trespass on land in the open air) omit ?in the open air? in both places where
those words appear.

As part of the Anti-Social Behaviour bill, the House of Lords in October 2003 passed an ammendment to the Criminal Justice Act which does the following:

* Reduces the legal definition of a “rave” to be 20, not 100 people

* makes indoor raves illegal

* stops organisers moving on to second sites.

Olympic Demolition Starts

With news that London is now odds on favourite to win the 2012 Olympic bid work has already started on the site.

The site near Homerton Road and Stratford High Road has seen builders arive Monday morning and starting to demolish buildings. When Su Crawford spoke to them and asked them what they were doing she was told, “It’s for the Olympics, this is going to be the site”

She is trying to organise a demonstration later today ( Monday 6th June ) and will be trying to stop or slow progress on the construction.

There are expected to be ongoing demonstrations and local resistance to the building, what some have seen as part of the ” new fascism”. Privatisation, local and national government corruption are filling the pockets of property developers in the guise of community regeneration ( see Liverpool’s Pathway for instance ). Londoners may have noticed their fares spiralling out of control as ordinary folk fund the business communities schemes.

For the past 20 years ‘urban regeneration’ has been an excuse for corporate chains to turn every high street into an identical area whilst getting public funding (regeneration grants ) and ousting small businessess and the poor.

In a very good article on the No 2 Olympics website Kevin Blowe exposes the main myths surrounding the Olympic bid including the notion that the Games will help the regeneration of east London.

Read his article on the No To Olympics 2012 website here.

RTF 3 – Party June 11th

Springing out of RTS London the Reclaim The Future party promises to be a cracker. It’s on Saturday 11th June in London at a DIY space and runs from 8 in the evening to 8 on Sunday morning.

There’s something for everyone with live techno sets from Geezer and Edit, punk from PAIN and the Inner Terrestrials, reggae from Nomadix Roots, agit folk from Riot Folk from the USA and much more including special guests TBA. The main stage features your comperes Viz and 2000DS/Crowzone Gary. There’s also vegan cafe, Indymedia cinema, comedy, samba, drum and bass, more live music, world beats, more techno, more punk, more folk, more chillout, serious visuals galore, magicians, gabba, Recclaim the Streets artwork plus and a nervous breakdown.

There are 3 live stages including the cabaret ( later doubling as chillout ), drum and bass room, techno rooms, Indymedia cinema,vegan cafe, info stalls and clean toilets and running water. OK this may not be the whole line-up but here goes :-

PAIN
Edit ( live techno )
Geezer ( Live techno )
DJ Zebedee
Debs Elemental
Inner Terrestrials
Gertrude
Naked Ruby
Sondrine ( Mal faiteurs )
Rhythms of Resistance samba band
Pok ( mandolin tunes )
Riot Folk ( US folk collective with sets from Evan Greer, Ryan Harvey, Mark Gunnery, and Christa Daring )
Electricity Comes From other Planets
Jah Free
Nomadix Roots
Pink Pork Chops
Offshore
Squall Jim
Geraldine ( Reclaim The Streets )
12 Volt Vandals ( low fi folk punk )
Ian Saville – Socialist Magician
Jazelle
Lower Depths ( kick-ass 3 piece )
Tofu Silverpants
Dead Cops Now Drum and Bass
Debs Elemental
Viz
Serum Sound system
Recknaw
Siren Sound system
DJ Seed
various VJs

plus more…..

On the day call 02076445155 or 07951868252.

Reviews and more info can be found on the Reclaim The Streets London website http://rts.gn.apc.org

‘Battle of the Beanfield’ Anniversary

It’s the 20th Anniversary of Operation Solstice – the state repression of travellers on their way to the Stonehenge Festival – the biggest of the many free festivals in the UK at that time. With the Criminal Justice Bill (sic) coming nearly 10 years later to effectively smash a revived festival scene including another generation are we now left with a poor consumer ‘substitute’….? Here’s a link to a couple of articles on Indymedia…

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2005/05/312088.html – Battle Of The Beanfield

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2005/05/312109.html – The Traveller Situation ( Tash )

Olympic evictions at Clays Lane

The University of East London is evicting students from its Park Village estate at Clays Lane, Stratford, East London. The estate is to be handed over to the London Development Agency and will be part of the site for the Olympic Village if London gets the 2012 Olympics. The students are being removed even though the decision on the Olympics won’t be made until 6th July and if London doesn’t get the Olympics the estate will be let out again through a housing agency. If London does get the Olympics then the LDA says it will demolish the estate within six months even though the rest of the Village site won’t be available for construction till 2007. Notice to quit for the students expires on 19th July.

The estate consists of two tower blocks and a large number of four or six person houses. It is in perfectly good condition! Have a look for yourselves.

Social homes used as power line buffers

Social housing in mixed-tenure developments is being deliberately built under overhead power cables in a bid to safeguard the profits from properties sold privately, according to a new study.

A team of researchers from Oxford Brookes University has found that developers are following the US practice of creating “corridors of public space” to block the view of unsightly overhead cables.

full report:- Inside Housing

Rampart Social Centre Birthday

Rampart 1st Birthday

Rampart Social Centre in London E1 is known for a variety of activities such as Internet Radio, video editing, band rehearsal, benefit events, and skillsharing projects. It is one of a few squatted political spaces that have sprung up around the country in the past few years. This weekend, May 21st, will see Rampart Street celebrate it’s first birthday.

A year is a long time in squatting in the UK with 2-5 months being typical.

Ramparts operate under the principles of ” non-hierarchical DIY culture” with a “strong emphasis on conscensus decision making” working on a purely non commercial basis.

So to celebrate in typical Ramparts style we can expect live music, film screenings documenting Social centre projects, vegan food, chillout and live music. Check the calendar and the Ramparts website for more details.

http://rampart.omxtra.net/modules/news/

Squatters in police station

Squatters find police station is good home without any charges
The Times UK January 17, 2005.

By Sean O’Neill and Nicola Woolcock

In its heyday, Arbour Square police station in Stepney held its share of notorious and hardened criminals including the Kray brothers and alleged IRA terrorists.

But the imposing red-brick building with attached courthouse has recently acquired an altogether different, some would say more anarchic, type of occupant –  squatters who have moved in and made themselves comfortably at home.

A skull and crossbones flag has replaced the Union Jack and flutters at half-mast over the disused building in Lodon’s East End while a Crimestoppers sticker remains in one of its windows. The police, who are powerless to evict squatters by force, are in the embarrassing position of having to take legal action to regain possession of what was their own building. The former home of law and justice had gone the way of many police stations, closing some years ago. It was recently sold at auction and contracts are due to be exchanged with the new owners who, it is thought, will convert it into luxury flats.

But the three-storey property has proved so popular with its current residents that they have put up a sign saying: “We are filled, there are no more spaces for people to live”. Police believe that the occupants are members of a network of “professional” squatters, who know their rights, have lawyers and mobile phones and organise music and art events. A legal notice taken from Section 6 of the Criminal Law Act has been posted on the front door. It advises that entry without the squatters’ permission is a criminal offence and that “we will prosecute” anyone attempting to enter by violence.

“If you want to get us out you will have to take out a summons for possession in the county court or in the High Court, or produce to us a written statement or certificate in terms of S.12A Criminal Law Act, 1977,” it adds.

A moss-covered Royal Coat of Arms is engraved above the building’s main door and a sign that gives the station’s opening hours remains in place, even though it shut in 1999. Most windows are covered with chipboard or corrugated metal sheets.

More than 20 people are living in the property, including a teaching assistant and a Polish couple.

They have hooked up lights and heaters to a mains electricity supply and are said to sleep in one part of the half-acre development while holding parties in the other.

A Metropolitan Police source said: “We will be seeking an injunction because obviously the new owners will want to have vacant possession.”

“It is all very embarrassing because they are probably using the old police showers and cooking in the police canteen.”